Picture Books About African American Musicians

Date
Jan, 15, 2020

PICTURE BOOKS ABOUT AFRICAN AMERICAN Musicians.This is a great collection of children's books that celebrate African American contributions in music. #musicpicturebooks #blackhistorymonth #diversebooksforchildren

One thing I love about music is it is reflective of whatever is going on in the world. Some of these musicians used their art as a way to express their feelings about their environment. Some made music to escape their reality. Others on this list made music from pure love. As a former musician (elementary school counts, right? lol), I can appreciate all their contributions to their passion for music.

I will update this list as I find more books! Follow me on Instagram to get updates and ideas for other picture books! If there’s a book you think I should add, comment below!

Just a friendly reminder, I am an Amazon Affiliate, so if you decided to use the links below to purchase the books, I do get a commission.

A Voice Named Aretha by Katheryn Russell-Brown

This is an amazing book about the Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin (1942-2018). You’ll learn all about her childhood and how it influenced to become a superstar!


How Jelly Roll Morton Invented Jazz by Jonah Winter

Jelly Roll Morton (1890-1941) was an early jazz musician who is known by some as the creator of jazz. This book introduces you to Jelly Roll Morton’s recipe for jazz.

 

Birth of the Cool: How the Great Miles Davis Found His Sound by Kathleen Cornell Berman

Miles Davis (1926-1991) was a jazz musician who played the trumpet and was a composer. In Birth of Cool, we learn how Miles turns his love of music into a successful career.

When the Beat was Born: DJ Kool Herc and the Creation of Hip Hop By Laban Carrick Hill

Clive “DJ Kool Herc” Campbell (1955-) was born in Jamaica but moved to New York City when he was 13. He brought to the United States his passion for music and his longing to become a DJ. Playing around at home, he creates something that will change the sound of music forever.
Since DJ Kool Herc was born in Jamaica, he is technically not African American, but I thought it was essential to include him on this list.

Little Melba and Her Big Trombone by Katheryn Russell-Brown

Melba Liston (1926-1999) was a self-taught trombone player from Kansas City, Missouri. In Little Melba and Her Big Trombone, we follow Melba’s journey to becoming a renowned jazz musician.

Jimi: Sounds Like a Rainbow: a Story of the Young Jimi Hendrix By Gary Golio

Before the guitarist James Marshall “Jimi” Hendrix (1942-1970) became a superstar he was just a kid that loved music. In this book, we learn how he was determined to become a star.

Bessie Smith and the Night Riders By Sue Stauffacher 

This book is based on a real event that happened to the musician Bessie Smith (1894-1937) . One night while performing, Bessie gets some unexpected and unwanted visitors. After this night, her fans learn that Bessie’s voice isn’t the only thing powerful about her.

Trombone Shorty by Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews

Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews (1986-) is a New Orleans musician, known for playing the trombone and trumpet. As a child, he wanted to be in a band so bad he started one with his neighborhood friends. In this book, we learn how he got his big break!

Harlem’s Little Blackbird:Florence Mills By Renee Watson 

Florence Mills (1896-1927), the Queen of Happiness was a singer, dancer, and actor. She was given her first Broadway part at the age of four. This is a great book about the international star, the illustrations make me love this book even more. 
 

The Roots of Rap: 16 Bars on the 4 Pillars of Hip-Hop by Carole Boston Weatherford

The Roots of Rap is not about one musician; it is about all of the artists that built the foundation of the genre. In this book, you will find credits to poets like Langston Hughes and Paul Laurence Dunbar to musicians like James Brown. Of course, the original O.G.’s like DJ Kool Herc, The Sugarhill, Gang, and Kurtis Blow get their recognition too.

Skit-Scat Raggedy Cat: Ella Fitzgerald By Roxane Orgill

Ella Fitzgerald (1917-1996) did not have any easy childhood, but she didn’t let it stop her. Find out how she finally got a chance to make it big.

Strange Fruit: Billie Holiday and the Power of a Protest Song By Gary Golio

Billie Holiday (1915-1959) knew she wanted to be somebody at a young age. At 15 years old she began performing in Harlem. Eventually Billie got tired of the discrimination she and others faced and agreed to sing a song that would express the pain of racism.

Dizzy By Jonah Winter

When Dizzy Gillespie (1917-1993) was a kid he got in trouble for breaking all the rules. As he got older, he learned how breaking music rules could help him become known around the world.

Spirit Seeker: John Coltrane’s Musical Journey by Gary Golio

John Coltrane (1926-1967) learned to play the saxophone in the basement of a church. Spirit Seeker takes us through the ups and downs of this talented musician’s career.

Although it is tastefully done, this book does mention his drug and alcohol abuse.

When Marian Sang: The True Recital of Marian Anderson By Pam Munoz Ryan 

When Marian (1897-1993) Sang gives you a glimpse into the life of Marian Anderson. Since I didn’t know much about her before reading the book, I like that the book started with her life as a child and ended when she became a professional singer.

Duke Ellington: The Piano Prince and His Orchestra By Andrea Davis Pinkney

Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington’s (1899-1974) parents made the decision to enroll him in piano lessons. At the time, Duke was not pleased, he wanted to play baseball. Eventually Duke learned to love the piano and would go on to become a critically acclaimed jazz composer.

Satchmo’s Blues By Alan Schroeder

Do you know who Satchmo is? It’s Louis Armstrong (1901-1971)! In Satchmo’s Blues, we learn how he gets his first trumpet and we can infer on how it would change his life forever. 

Do you do daily read alouds in your reading block? Have you tried interactive read alouds? Interactive read alouds are a great way to engage your students while you’re reading. You can use interactive read alouds to teach or reteach reading skills from your lesson. More importantly, interactive read alouds are great way to trick your students into learning reading skills! #interactivereadalouds #readaloud #readalouds #readaloudtips

A RESOURCE YOU WOULD LIKE

The Free Interactive Read Aloud Guide

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Melissa Nikohl

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